Sadhana Singh

Sadhana Singh is a senior at Trinity Washington University and a former intern at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

We Are Not Bargaining Chips

A Dreamer’s account of the life “in limbo” that the undocumented are compelled to lead—and how the battle for legalization became a battle for America’s good name

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images Immigration rights protesters march to the U.S. Capitol T he past months have been traumatizing for Dreamers. Fifteen months, to be exact. On November 8, 2016, I cried alone in my college dorm room as the full weight of America’s ignorance and xenophobia confronted me. On January 21, 2017, I held my breath as I waited for the new president to drop the hammer on DACA, a policy he fixated on during his campaign and swore to end on “day one.” On September 5, 2017, the administration finally got around to it. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, touting a host of feeble, erroneous justifications , announced that the president was canceling DACA. It was a crushing moment of anger, frustration, fear, and uncertainty for me, my younger brother, and the roughly 800,000 others who shared our status. His voice still rings in my head. For me, DACA was a mammoth salvation. It came into my life when I was 26 years old, mired in hopes, dreams, and potential...

Holding Fast to Dreams: Undocumented Youth Want True Immigration Reform

Dreamers want advancement beyond DACA and DAPA.

(Photo: AP/Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
(Photo: AP/Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call) Immigrant advocates from United We Dream chant in front of the White House on July 28, 2014. E lection 2016 is complicated for millennials. They flocked to Bernie Sanders. Their top issues—the economy, the high cost of college, and the environment and climate change—have been overshadowed by the furor over emails and sexual abuse. Many of them are first-time voters casting ballots without enthusiasm—if they are voting at all. But Dreamers, the young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children with their parents, are paying close attention to the election even though they cannot vote. A Hillary Clinton presidency raises key concerns for young people who’ve seen their hopes for a clear path to American citizenship dashed. Yet the prospect of a Donald Trump presidency brings on high anxiety, too. They remain fearful about the outcome in this tight race. For this group of people who has to sit on the sidelines on November 8, the...